UK Farm Animal Genetic Resources (FAnGR) Breed Inventory

Statistical release and interactive data explorer


What is this webpage?

This webpage allows a user to explore FAnGR data in a more interactive way and gain a deeper insight into the patterns emerging from trends over time. It is published alongside the full timeseries at UK Farm Animal Genetic Resources (FAnGR) Breed Inventory Results.

This release announces the number of pedigree farm animals in the UK in 2017 and estimates of the breeding female livestock populations for 2018.

Data in the inventory are sourced from individual breed society records. As all pedigree animals need to be registered with their respective society to receive their pedigree certificate, the breed society records are comprehensive. Therefore, the data provided for all categories (with the exception of the estimates of breeding females) have complete coverage so require no estimation.


How do I use it?

Navigate through the webpage using the tabs at the top. Further details and instructions are provided on each tab. In summary:

  • Introduction: Provides users with an overview of this tool.
  • FAnGR Timeseries Explorer: An interactive tab that allows user to explore the different indicators for the FAnGR data in more detail.
  • Data Query: An interactive tab that allows user to view and download datasets containing a large range of statistics for their chosen specie.
  • Methodology: Information on the methodology of the data.


Who made it?

This webpage was created by Defra statisticians in the Future Farming Evidence and Analysis team, on behalf of the FAnGR Secretariat.

Who can I contact about this data?

FAnGR secretariat email: fangr@defra.gsi.gov.uk phone: +44 (0)208 026 3642

Lead Statistician: Helen Hoult email: helen.hoult@defra.gsi.gov.uk phone: +44 (0)208 225 7885


Exploring historical FAnGR Data

Generate report

Find breeds that meet certain criteria

Select breed status

Click below to download a .csv file of the selection

Download data

Selected data:

To sort data click column headers. To seach your selection use the search box below.

Methodology and Information


Definitions

  • Female registrations: Number of pedigree female registrations (fully pure-bred, pedigree registered, UK born)

  • Male registrations: Number of pedigree male registrations (fully pure-bred, pedigree registered, UK born)

  • Breeding Female Population:

    • For Cattle, Sheep, Goats, KuneKune pigs & British Lop pigs: Estimated by multiplying the average number of female registrations over the PREVIOUS three complete years by standard coefficients.
    • For Horses: No standard multipliers are available so all estimates provided were sourced directly from breed societies.
    • For Pigs, except KuneKune & British Lop: Defined as the number of pedigree registered breeding sows and are the results from the annual Bloodline Census run by the British Pig Association.
  • Breeding herds: Number of active pedigree herds which registered pedigree offspring in the specific year

  • Breeding herds in latest 3 years: Number of active pedigree herds which registered offspring in any of the latest three years

  • Keepers (pigs only): Number of breed society members keeping registered pigs. Results from the annual Bloodline Census run by the British Pig Association.

  • Sires: Annual number of pedigree sires which produced pedigree registered offspring in the year

  • Dams: Annual number of pedigree dams which produced pedigree registered offspring in the year

  • Effective Population: The effective population size indicates the genetic diversity within the breed, by accounting for the total number of animals in a population and the relative numbers of male and female parents (sires and dams). A low effective population size signifies a greater likelihood of inbreeding and a higher risk of loss of genetic diversity.


Coverage

Data in the inventory is sourced from individual breed society records. As all pedigree animals need to be registered with their respective society to receive their pedigree certificate, the breed society records are comprehensive. Therefore, the data provided for all categories (except for estimates of breeding females and the estimated effective population) have complete coverage and require no estimation. Any breed-specific exceptions to this coverage are detailed in the “Definitions & Breed notes” tab.


Methodology

Data is collected annually for around 50% of all breeds and every three years for the others. The annual returns are collated by central organisations that already have access to all the data, either from breed society databases or from surveys which they already run for other purposes. This is designed as a highly efficient way to gather large amounts of data with very little effort by breed societies. Breed societies have given their permission for these companies to supply the data every year for this exercise.

Data for all other breeds is collected via a survey on a three yearly basis. Questionnaires are emailed or posted and non-respondents are contacted several times to encourage response. Priority is given to gathering comprehensive data from native breeds. It is made clear to participating breed societies in advance that all data supplied will be published (as it is all collected at the aggregate level). Therefore, there are no confidentiality issues around the data. Some breed societies already publish this information in their flock/ herd books.

The categories of data collected in the annual and three yearly exercises are exactly the same. Data is published for all these categories and gives a comprehensive picture of the structure of each breed.

A key variable is the number of pedigree breeding females. The actual number of these animals is not always directly available from breed societies as the databases are not always completely up to date. Therefore, estimates are made of this key measure. This estimate is made by multiplying the average number of pedigree female registrations over the previous three complete years by multipliers defined for each species (see Table below) to estimate the number of breeding females (so for example, the number of pedigree breeding females for 2015 is calculated as the average number of female registrations for 2012, 2013 and 2014 and multiplied by the appropriate multiplier below). The multiplier is calculated using historic data on the ratio of the number of adult females in a breed to the number of female registrations in a year. The full technical description for these multipliers is available in the source document linked below the table.

Multiplier

Species Multiplier
Cattle 3.52
Sheep 2.41
Pigs 2.7
Goats 5.16

Source : https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/uk-farm-animal-genetic-resources-fangr-breed-inventory-results

The effective population size (Ne) for each breed in the inventory was calculated using Sewell Wright's formula (see formula below). The effective population size indicates the genetic diversity within the breed, by accounting for the total number of animals in a population and the relative numbers of male and female parents (sires and dams). A low effective population size signifies a greater likelihood of inbreeding and a higher risk of loss of genetic diversity. An effective population of 50 is set as a threshold for concern by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

Sewell Wright's formula for effective population (Ne)

Ne = 4( MF / (M+F) )

Where M = number of sires and F = number of dams.

For full details, see the JNCC bio-diversity indicator Technical background document: http://jncc.defra.gov.uk/page-4240


Data Sources

All the annual data is reported through either

  • Grassroots Systems Ltd.,
  • the British Pig Association or
  • the Rare Breeds Survival Trust.

Between them, we receive annual data from around 50% of breeds (125 out of around 250 total breeds) and which accounts for 72% of native breeds (97 out of 134). Coverage has been steadily increasing since the annual inventory was first developed in 2013. The pig data on numbers of pedigree breeding sows (with the exception of the British Lop and Kune Kune) are sourced from the Bloodline Census, an annual exercise carried out by the British Pig Association. This Census also collects data on the number of members keeping registered pigs so this data has been included as an additional table in the pigs data set.


Revisions Policy

If any revisions are required to past data we will update the published results as early as possible and provide information about these revisions in the Excel dataset.


Quality Assurance

For Quality Assurance reasons, results are shared in advance of publication to members of the FAnGR committee. This is to check that definitions are correct and understandable and that the presentation of tables are clear, contain the most appropriate metadata and in the most suitable format.


Background

The UK has one of the richest native Farm Animal Genetic Resources (FAnGR) populations in the world and the importance of FAnGR has been recognised at both international and UK levels. Because of this, a commitment was made under national and global biodiversity strategies to establish an annual inventory to show how breed populations are changing over time.

The FAnGR breed inventory was set up by Defra in 2013 to deliver that commitment and the inventory is steadily increasing in scope and coverage each year. Once trends become apparent from the inventory, it enables decisions to be made to safeguard UK livestock biodiversity and to help future-proof UK farming.

These results build on the findings from the 2012 UK Country Report on Farm Animal Genetic Resources (FAnGR) and are a collaborative effort between the national Farm Animal Genetic Resources (FAnGR) Expert Committee, Defra and the Devolved Administrations who work together to support the conservation and sustainable use of UK FAnGR. The inventory complements the committee's other monitoring efforts and the work of the Rare Breeds Survival Trust on conservation and protection of UK rare and native breeds of farm animals.


Further data sources

Full results from the Breed Inventory

2012 UK Country report

FAnGR policy information

Research report into predicting the number of breeding females based on registration data

UK biodiversity indicator - animal genetic resources: effective population size of native breeds at risk


Notes relating to specific breeds

The data for some breeds has limitations, or additional information associated with it. This list will be updated regularly.

Additional pig breeds

Additional breeds registered under EU Zootechnical legislation. Detailed data is not available due to commercial confidentiality.